Some thoughts on the election

So, a lot of people (including me) saw that one coming.  I just never imagined that the GOP secret chiefs were so vain that they would end up taking their own propaganda as truth.  At some point they lost the distinction between math, and the math they were doing to make their candidate feel better.  Mitt Romney didn’t help his cause any himself, in fact he almost single-handedly won the election for Obama back in 2011, with his campaign tactics in the primaries.  By perpetually locking the second (or briefly first) place candidate in a series of negative ads, America was pretty well versed in every negative aspect of Mitt Romney long before Obama had run a single ad.  Of course, Romney also ran the most secretive political campaign in history, with the bulk of his policy offerings consisting of, as Stephen Colbert put it, “you’ll find out later.” 

Continue reading

Some thoughts on the election

So, a lot of people (including me) saw that one coming.  I just never imagined that the GOP secret chiefs were so vain that they would end up taking their own propaganda as truth.  At some point they lost the distinction between math, and the math they were doing to make their candidate feel better.  Mitt Romney didn’t help his cause any himself, in fact he almost single-handedly won the election for Obama back in 2011, with his campaign tactics in the primaries.  By perpetually locking the second (or briefly first) place candidate in a series of negative ads, America was pretty well versed in every negative aspect of Mitt Romney long before Obama had run a single ad.  Of course, Romney also ran the most secretive political campaign in history, with the bulk of his policy offerings consisting of, as Stephen Colbert put it, “you’ll find out later.” 

Continue reading

A Terrible Recovery

So, in continuing his theme of being one of less than ten Democrats with any testicular fortitude, Joe Biden recently referred to the members of the financial industry who objected to the Obama administration’s rather meek reforms as ‘squealing pigs’.  I think that this is rather uncharitable to pigs, which are vile, shit-eating-and-wallowing, oft-cannibalistic beasts who only seek to consume and defecate, but are still a bit more honorable and dignified than an American investment banker.  In response, a spokesman for the Lord Romneytron/Granny Starver campaign said “That assertion led Romney spokesman Ryan Williams to retort: “Vice President Biden’s claim that the middle class is ‘coming back’ couldn’t be more out of touch with the reality. Whether it’s high unemployment, falling incomes, soaring tuition costs, or rising prices, middle-class families are struggling in the worst economic recovery America has ever had.”

So, it’s an economic recovery, but the worst one we’ve ever had.  Is that implying that this recovery could be better, if there were not some kind of roadblock, or obstruction, preventing it?  Perhaps as if some weird and malevolent force were trying as hard as possible to block any kind of legislation that would improve the economy for purely political reasons?  Perhaps this party, and its financial supporters, could even be responsible for the high unemployment (outsourcing), falling incomes (economic competition with 2nd and 3rd world countries), tuition costs (who always wants to cut state school higher ed funding?), rising prices (energy price deregulation) and even try to eliminate tax breaks for the economically lower 80% of this country?  Clearly, everything would be better if instead of trying to do anything to recover, we simply continued all the Reagan/Bush policies that led to the recession in the first place.  I’m sure it will work out for the best this time.

Progressive Unemployment Reform, part 1

The reason it is difficult to solve the unemployment problem in this country is that the problem is systemic in nature.  That is to say that rather than being the result of a simple coincidence, ‘the recession’, our unemployment issues arise from a number of institutionalized processes which have been in place for quite some time now.  Consequently, simply addressing unemployment the way that we currently do is not productive in terms of solving the actual problem; in fact I believe that it in its current incarnation it may in fact be counterproductive.  Instead, we need to come up with a plan for dealing with unemployment by correcting the faults in our system that create a steadily growing population of unemployed adults.  Continue reading

HILARIOUS STORY FROM THE POST

So funny.  So very funny.  And the more you think about it, the more funny it gets.  Here’s the headline:

Popular bill that could save Colorado $60 million a year languishes

So, of course this is the Denver Post, so my first assumption is that this is about some sort of ridiculous tax cut like, I dunno, cutting emergency services to neighborhoods with low property values.  However, it is actually because Colorado, in a somewhat reasonable decision, doesn’t allow governments to invest in anything with a less than sterling credit rating.  Unfortunately, you know who has unfortunately had some credit problems recently?  The United States Government.

Let that sink in for a minute.  That’s right, the state and local governments of Colorado are now no longer able to invest their money into the Federal Government, which up until the credit downgrade had apparently provided net gains to our general governmental budgets of $60 million per year.  You might wonder why, in an age of budget cuts, such a thing didn’t fly through the legislative process on guilded wings.  It did, in fact, fly through committee in just such a mannor, but has yet to be addressed in the House proper.  While the Post remains mystified by this, as the only person who they believe could shed any light on the matter is House Speaker Frank McNulty, who is unquestionably responsible for why the bill hasn’t been addressed.  When asked about this,

House Speaker Frank McNulty, R-Highlands Ranch, did not respond to repeated attempts to obtain comment. However, a spokesman, Owen Loftus, said, “Different bills move at different paces.”

So here is why, since the Post refuses to say it and I refuse to believe that they are that stupid. As Jon Stewart pointed out on last night’s memo, our national debt is a republican party talking point, and much more, a lynchpin of the entire Republican National Strategy, which is fairly simple. Using our debt as an excuse, they sell government assets and responsibilities to companies controlled by their cronies as ‘privatization’. As any honest economist will tell you, this is the opposite of how a nation needs to recover from a budget crisis. As this only acts to worsen the situation, this will cause the general economy to worsen overall, while it improves for the select few controlling the companies that benefit from privatization, as has been the case since the Reagan administration. This will increase the national debt, continuing their justification for more budget cuts and privatization. It isn’t a plan to recover from debt, but to exploit the debt at the expense of the taxpayer to benefit a comparatively miniscule percentage of the population; and the concept of government debt is the keystone of the entire strategy. This happens on both a national level and a state and local level, and it is happening right now in Colorado. So McNulty will let the bill languish longer in the house, until it is no longer politically convenient for him to do so, or until they put together a law that instead of allowing local governments to invest in the Federal Government, allows them to invest in Republican campaign contributors chosen by the House. Oh shit, that is totally what is going to happen.

Democrat senators open long forgotten file cabinet, finding testicles and job description

This is, without a doubt, the most intense piece of tax reform we have seen in a long time; in that if it passes the rich will have to pay a minimum of 30 percent of their adjusted gross income; still a slightly lower percent of income than the average american, but about twice the percent they pay now.
Of course, this will pass in the senate and fail in the republican controlled house.  The senators clearly know this, and I would bet they also know that it will fail in the house just in time to run a billion campaign ads about how the Republicans are the lapdogs of the right.  An entirely valid criticism as well as one that is rather popular with the 87 percent of americans who disapprove of congress at the moment.  So, either the republicans do what their sacred formula dictates and block the tax reform, giving dems an assload (science term)  of political ammunition; or we get some real, legitimate tax reform and debt/budget relief.  Its a win win, and I wonder if the only reason it took so long for them to do it is because they were saving it for now.  Clearly they watched this past season of Boardwalk Empire.

Link:
http://m.denverpost.com/denverpost/db_108615/contentdetail.htm?contentguid=SZUZDazj

Clean energy and the restoration of the nation

So Obama wants to really focus on clean energy?  Welcome to ten years ago.  Since this has been the most logical path for the country since I have been capable of logical thought, I have had a great deal of time to think about it.  Here are some of my ideas:
1) Put our farm subsidies to good use by paying farmers to energy farm instead of growing weeds; and restructure the current tax credit and rebate system to make it actually profitable for the landowners of the american midwest and west to use their property for renewable energy.
2) Allow states to directly compete in the energy market using energy they buy directly from the citizenry.  Don’t like xcel gas?  How about solar from colorado, wind from wyoming, or hydroelectric from the pacific northwest?  The system of power for profit is bankrupting this country, we can fix this by allowing the profit to flow into back into the government, and then back to the people.
3) Let us reallocate the grotesque amount of funds currently being spent on military technology and overseas troop deployment for the purposes of both building all this awesome clean energy shit as well as improving our nations roads.  I would also like to see the advent of a high speed electric rail line across the whole damn country powered by the renewable energy assets of the states it passes through and run by the government for a restricted amount of profit.  I know this seems expensive, but its a better idea than, oh, a permanent base on the moon.

Here is a link to the speech on clean energy.

http://m.denverpost.com/denverpost/db_108614/contentdetail.htm?contentguid=XKe22TG9